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Mole Removal

Moles can be removed for cosmetic reasons, or because they’re potentially cancerous (melanoma). Most unwanted moles can be safely removed with little to no residual scarring.  We have had great success removing moles with a plasma pen, or shaving them off with a scalpel.  If the mole looks suspicious we will send it for studies to make sure it is not cancerous. 

Moles are clumps of pigment cells called melanocytes. These skin growths can range in color from flesh colored to dark brown.  Moles are usually benign, but any large, irregular, or changing moles should be checked to ensure they're not cancerous.

Having your moles removed can make a huge difference in your appearance. It is a simple procedure that takes just a few minutes with mild to no discomfort.  

Plasma Pen - Botox Oahu
Mole Removal - Botox Oahu
Mole Removal - Botox Oahu
Mole Removal - Botox Oahu
Mole Removal - Botox Oahu

Understanding Skin Moles

Skin moles, also known as nevi, are common growths on the skin that can appear in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. They are typically benign, meaning they are not cancerous, but it is important to monitor them for changes in shape, size, or color, as these can be signs of skin cancer.

Types of Skin Moles

 

There are several different types of moles that can appear on the skin, each with their own unique characteristics. These include:

Common moles: These moles are typically small and round, with a smooth and even surface. They are usually brown or black in color and can be found anywhere on the body, but are most common on the face, arms, and legs.

 

Atypical moles: These moles, also known as dysplastic nevi, are larger than common moles and have an irregular shape. They can be a variety of colors, including tan, brown, and black, and may have uneven coloration. They are more likely to develop into skin cancer than common moles.

 

Blue nevi: These moles are typically blue or gray in color and can be found anywhere on the body. They are benign but can be mistaken for melanoma, a type of skin cancer.

 

Halo nevi: These moles have a ring of lighter skin around the mole, giving it a "halo" appearance. They are benign but can be a sign of other underlying skin conditions.

 

Congenital nevi: These moles are present at birth and can vary in size and color. They have a higher risk of developing into skin cancer and should be monitored closely.

 

Acral lentiginous melanoma: This type of mole is more common in people with darker skin and can appear as a dark spot on the palms, soles, or under the nails. It is a rare but aggressive form of skin cancer.

 

Spitz nevi: These moles are typically found on the legs and arms and can resemble melanoma. They are usually benign but should be monitored for changes.

Seborrheic keratosis: is a common noncancerous (benign) skin growth that people tend to get more of as they age. They are usually brown, black or light tan in color and have a waxy or scaly appearance, slightly raised from the skin. They usually appear gradually on the face, neck, chest or back.

Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic Keratosis

It is also known as "wisdom spots" or "barnacles.

Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic Keratosis

They often appear in clusters or groups on the skin.

Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic keratosis is more common in people who are middle-aged or older

Dysplastic Nevi

Dysplastic Nevi

Brown dysplastic Nevi don't confuse with a melanoma

Melanoma

Melanoma

You should look for a mole with an irregular shape, such as having a sharp edge, or two or more very different-looking halves.

Melanoma

Melanoma

Slightly irregular edge of the mole as it may indicate skin cancer in the initial stages

Dysplastic Nevi

Dysplastic Nevi

Some common moles have an irregular appearance and are called dysplastic nevi or atypical moles

Melanoma

Melanoma

Look for growths that have an uneven distribution of color or many colors.

Dysplastic Nevi

Dysplastic Nevi

Dysplastic nevi may appear anywhere on the skin, but are most commonly found on sun-exposed areas.

Common Mole

Common Mole

Uniform color, round regular base.

Common mole

Common mole

There are no Common Garden Moles in Hawaii.

Common Mole

Common Mole

Having more than 50 common moles increases a person's risk of developing skin cancer.

Common Mole

Common Mole

Common moles, also known as nevi

Common Mole

Common Mole

Common Mole

Common Mole

Common moles can appear anywhere on the skin, but are most commonly found on the back, chest, and arms

Monitoring and Treating Moles

 

It is important to regularly check your moles for any changes in shape, size, or color. If you notice any changes, it is important to schedule a visit with a dermatologist. They can perform a biopsy to determine if the mole is benign or if it requires further treatment.

Treatment for moles will depend on the type and characteristics of the mole. Common moles that are not causing any problems do not typically require treatment. Atypical moles or moles that are showing signs of changes may be removed for further examination.

If you have a large number of moles, or if you have a family history of skin cancer, it may be helpful to have a dermatologist perform a full-body examination to check for any moles that may need further attention.

Conclusion

 

Moles are a common occurrence on the skin, and while most are benign, it is important to monitor them for changes that could indicate skin cancer. By understanding the different types of moles, their characteristics, and when to seek treatment, you can take an active role in protecting your skin health.

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