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Botox for Migraine Headache Prevention

These are the 27 very specific locations where Botox is injected to prevent Migraine headaches.  You will need about 155 units of Botox spread evenly over these sites.  If you are currently getting Botox injections for Migraines and they are not injecting in these specific sites then it is being administered incorrectly and your results will be inferior.  Some physicians will inject Botox on the top of the head where there are no muscles or into the back of the neck which will give you a bobble head.  If the Botox is injected too fast then the procedure is much more painful then necessary.   Dr Schaefer is expert on giving the Botox exactly where it will do the most benefit and with the minimum amount of discomfort. 

Botox Injection Sites for Migraine Prevention

Migraine Botox Sites - Botox Oahu
Migraine Botox Sites - Botox Oahu

How Botox for Migraines work?

 

Botox is injected into muscles around your head and neck area that are associated with headache pain. It helps to block a chemical neurotransmitter known as acetylcholine that carries pain signals. When injected, Botox helps to prevent activation of the pathways in your head and neck that lead to migraine headache pain.

Botox is given as injections in 7 muscle areas around your head and neck, every 12 weeks. Each injection session takes about 30 minutes at the clinic. Most patients start with two sessions to see how well Botox works for them.  Botox is a neurotoxin, but is given in small doses not absorbed into the bloodstream.  In order to get you insurance to pay for your Botox you will need to have failed 2 other preventative medications like beta blockers, or amitriptyline.   We are experts at getting the prior authorization and insurance paperwork so that you can receive this life changing treatment at little to no additional out of pocket expense using the BotoxSavingsProgram.com program.  

 

How well does Botox work for migraines?

Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) is a preventive medication that helps to stop a migraine headache before it starts. In studies, Botox was shown to prevent on average 8 to 9 headache days a month, and those headaches that you do have are less severe.  Some of our patients go from having 15 migraines a month to 1 or 2.  

 

Botox is approved to be used in adults to prevent chronic migraine headaches that occur on 15 or more days per month and that last for at least 4 hours. At least 8 of the headache days must be associated with migraine.

Because Botox is an injection you receive every 12 weeks, you won’t have to remember to take a daily pill for migraine prevention. You can combine Botox with oral medications for acute migraine treatment to help reduce pain once a headache has already begun, if approved by your doctor.

 

How long does it take for Botox to work?

 

Some patients may see improvements in their headache frequency in the first 4 weeks, but most patients who see improvements will notice them after the second injection at 12 weeks.

 

In 24-week long studies, patients continued to see reductions in their number of headache days on most days over the 24-week period. Botox also lowered the total length of time of headaches on days when they occurred over the study period, when compared to placebo.

 

Botox is not recommended for the preventive treatment of episodic migraine, which means they occur less than 14 days a month, however there are other medications that we can offer that can make a huge difference for those episodic migraines. 

 

Bottom Line

  • Botox is a preventive medicine and can help to stop a migraine headache before it starts. It is injected by a healthcare professional into muscles around your head and neck every 12 weeks.

  • In studies, Botox prevented about 8 to 9 headache days a month, and decreased the severity of any residual headaches.

  • Botox helps to block a chemical neurotransmitter known as acetylcholine that carries pain signals. When injected, Botox helps to prevent activation of the pathways that lead to migraine headache pain.

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